Remembering 9/11

America and the rest of the world observes the 20th Anniversary of the 9/11 attacks; but few can honestly say that the world is safe.

Remembering 9/11
David Filipov looks for a picture of his father, Al Filipov, at the Tribute WTC Visitor Center in New York City. The center is run by the September 11th Families Association as a museum and memorial to the victims and history of the World Trade Center and the 9/11/2001 attacks. Filipov's father was on American Airlines Flight 11, the first plane flown into the towers. (Scott Lewis)

There are days and events people would like to forget; and there are instances that are always etched in memories. To me, 9/11 or September 11, 2001 is a day that can never be forgotten. I was in New York that day and for several more following the dastardly terror attack that not only destroyed the landmark World Trade Center Building but also took the lives of some 2900 people whose only fault was to have to been in the wrong place and at the wrong time.

Based in Washington DC as a Special Correspondent of The Hindu, my journalistic assignment also included the United Nations. The routine that I took upon myself was to visit the great city once a month or thereabouts; reach on a Sunday afternoon; cover United Nations’ activities on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and usually depart for Washington DC on a Thursday morning by Amtrak. Staying on this schedule, I reached New York on September 9, attended United Nations the following day and was getting ready on September 11 morning in my hotel room in Lexington Avenue when the phone rang.