The pain continues in Sri Lanka

Officials in Colombo are involved in a painful and slow exercise: on the one hand to negotiate with countries with which huge loans have been taken, for re-structuring the debt

The pain continues in Sri Lanka
Tension in front of the World Trade Center. Medical students are mobilized (Photo by Krishnakumar for News Cutter)

It is not a good feeling for Sri Lankans to see their country in such an economic mess. In fact getting beyond the feelings of locals even people in the neighborhood and beyond are saddened at the goings-on in a country that at one time was an envy to many. In fact some have already started talking about how a “pearl” drop has come to be a “tear” drop, an obvious reference to the shape of that island nation. But when Ranil Wickremesinghe took over as the Prime Minister for the sixth time, there are hopes that Sri Lanka would once again bounce back to where it belongs in the comity of nations but not before the struggle goes through the full circle.

With fuel rationed and nearly out of supply, the government has apparently made it clear to foreign airline carriers that they cannot lift aviation fuel from Colombo—either come tanked up for the return flight or be ready to refill along the way. Normally prudent carriers will fill up their tanks at a port where aviation fuel is cheaper, such as in the Middle East; but no airline would want to do a detour if that is not cost effective. With Colombo supposedly putting the word out on aviation fuel, the demand is said to be higher in Southern Indian cities.